19. If I Only Knew Then with Liane Wakabayashi

October 27, 2021

In This Episode
God allows us to be on different and unique journeys only to bring us closer to Him. Liane Grunburg Wakabayashi moved to Japan after her Masters in Columbia University to become a writer. She met her husband in Japan and they raised their two children there before making Aliyah. The career-driven 25 year old had no idea that she would be moved by the Chabad houses in Japan, which made her realize what had been missing in her life. In this episode, she shares a glimpse of her memoir, The Wagamama Bride, and reflections on her transformational journey.

Highlights
00:55 Liane is an artist who lived in Japan for 30 years then moved to Israel with her family.
01:41 It took Liane 9 years to write her memoir, The Wagamama Bride.
02:32 At 25 years old, Liane was given the opportunity to write in Japan. She moved to Japan from New York to develop herself as a writer.
05:05 The Grunberg family practiced Conservative Judaism in New York but when she moved to Japan, she felt a longing for tradition, guidelines, routine, and seasonal awareness of celebrations to connect to.
07:53 The Wakabayashis welcomed Liane with open arms when she married Aki, her husband. In the first few years of marriage, Liane integrated Taoist, Buddhist, and Shinto practices into her marriage then two Chabad houses open in Japan after twelve years.
09:36 When the Chabad houses arrived in Tokyo, Liane knew she was ready to walk into the Chabad.
11:26 After joining the community, Liane realized that the joy children bring and how they enliven the atmosphere was missing in her Tokyo life.
14:14 One of the gifts of Chabad House to the Wakabayashis was the friends who became family, especially for her children.
18:29 Liane wishes that she had people, like a Rabbi or Rebbetzin, that she could speak to when she was 25.
20:34 Even if Liane had someone to shower her with warmth and love, she believes that she still would not have been open to deepening her practice without the vulnerabilities that her career and Japan gave her.
21:54 Nothing changes unless the consciousness shifts. She was grateful for the relationships with her in-laws and parents because these nourished and made it possible for her to continue.
23:59 God guides us through what we had to go through to know what we know now.
24:23 There are no regrets for Liane. She is very grateful for everything she has gone through.

Links
Liane Wakabayashi: Website
The Wagamama Bride: A Jewish Family Saga Made in Japan: Amazon
5 Surprising Ways to Improve Your Marriage
Marriage Breakthrough Retreat

Marriage Breakthrough Retreat Testimonials
“Hi! I’m Lilach, and I am lucky enough to be Rebbetzin Bat-Chen’s sister. Of course, I was going to be at her retreat. Now, I thought I heard everything I need to hear. I mean, I talk to Bat-Chen pretty often and I’m always getting good advice and amazing insights from her but going to the retreat really made some things very clear for me, and the way that she leads through the exercises, the visualizations, and thought experiments. It really makes you reflect in a way that’s super effective, and all of a sudden I find myself thinking of things that we did through the retreat and it really is helping me all the time. So if you’re thinking about it, you should definitely go. Not just because she’s my sister but because the ideas that she shares in the retreat will make a difference for your life.”
– Dr. Lilach Saperstein

“Hi! My name is Rivka. I wanted to recommend Rebbetzin Bat-Chen’s retreat. I took it last year and really enjoyed it even though I’m married over 20 years and I’ve done other workshops. This was really wonderful. Very helpful and gave me a whole bunch of new insights, a whole bunch of new tools, and I learned a lot from it. So go ahead—enjoy and see how it can help you also. Take care. Bye.”
– Rivka

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REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
Welcome to the Connected For Real Podcast! I’m Rebbetzin Bat-Chen Grossman, a marriage coach for women in business, and my mission is to bring God’s presence into your life, into your marriage, and into your business. Let’s get started. And we are live. Welcome to the Connected for Real Podcast. I am Rebbetzin Bat-Chen Grossman. I am a marriage coach for God-centered women in business, and today we are talking to Liane Grunburg Wakabayashi. I hope I said that right cause I have been practicing. The title of today is If I Only Knew Then, and I really wanted to have Liane here to tell us about her book and her experience and her journey. So Liane, introduce yourself and tell us what is all about.

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
Thanks Bat-Chen for having me here. I’m very excited to speak to your audience about a topic close to my heart, which is international marriage. I lived in Japan for 30 years. I was married for 26 years to a Tokyo-born and raised acupuncturist and Eastern philosopher. We have two beautiful children. One is in Tokyo working for a kosher food company there, speaking Hebrew every day, and my daughter is here with me in Israel. She too is an artist. So, I write, I paint and I teach art online. That’s my—I coach art artists online. So this is what I do. I spent nine years writing this memoir, from 2012 to 2021 this year, when it was published, and during that time I went through a lot of transformations. The book was not about me coming to Israel, but that’s where I landed with both feet on the ground, and I’m really happy to be in Jerusalem to start a new life and to talk about transitions—the transitions that we choose and the transitions that are chosen from Ha’Shamayim (the Heaven). I am here to answer any questions to discuss with you this topic.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
That is beautiful. Okay. So I want to just make this really clear. You were, how many years in Tokyo?

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
I was 30 years in Japan.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
Okay, and how did you end up there? Cause you’re not from Japan.

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
Nobody in my family was from Japan. I was at Columbia university working on my master’s degree in arts administration, and I was freelance writing on the side and working in the Columbia Business School of Public Relations Office, which just to, to say I was immersed in university culture when I was there. I was very, very interested in one professor at Columbia who was the Japan expert and he was, writing and speaking to the press daily about the economic miracle Somehow that became like a bee in my bun, and I was fascinated by this economic miracle because I saw that it had cultural implications. I have always been interested in the arts. I have a master’s degree in arts administration from Columbia. I got on a plane. I went to Japan. I interviewed people in the art world there, but particularly in this niche world of department stores, where some of the best exhibitions were being held in. Nobody in New York knew about this.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
And how old were you?

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
So I was 25. I felt like I’d stumbled onto something so exciting that I wrote my master’s thesis on the subject, and two years later, I was sent back by a travel magazine to write about this topic. I said to my parents. “I’m going, I’ll be back in eight months, and, I’ve got to be there. I just have to be there.” Well, eight months became 30 years. So I was there on a mission, a personal mission—a quest to develop myself as a runner. I was hired by the Japan Times as a copy editor and a contributing writer then a columnist for the daily newspaper of, of Japan in English, the English language paper, and, I created a life and in the newspaper world and around me in the Jewish community of Tokyo, which was something that became a wonderful anchor for me. I would call it a cultural anchor rather than a spiritual anchor, but that was just about as much as I could handle at the time. It was a wonderful, wonderful life from the get go.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
Sorry, I’m going to interrupt you. I’m very good at that. Did you have a Jewish anchor in the United States before you went?

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
That’s a great question. My family background was in Conservative Judaism and my connection with the synagogue world ended after my bat mitzvah because, as you probably know, conservatives treat the bat mitzvah as a graduation exercise rather than the launching of a Jewish life, and so I took it to heart. That’s what I did. I kind of graduated from a Jewish life, but at the same time, there was an emptiness inside me, a kind of longing for some kind of authentic life with guidelines, traditions, routine and kind of a seasonal awareness of celebrations that, that I could connect to. Sadly, my family, suffered a lot during the war years in Romania, and when they got to America, whatever Judaism, they had this shed and there was really no family to celebrate Jewish life with.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
So this was a real opportunity to have that connection.

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI

Well, ironically, it would be Japan where I found that connection with, Jewish life.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
You know, you think ironically, but it’s so classic because it’s only when you get away from your routine and what you’re used to that you’re open to hearing what you actually want what your soul is actually asking for. A lot of people find this, you know? You have all these Israelis going to South America or India or whatever, just to get away to come back to themselves, and so this is very classic and I think it’s something beautiful. Don’t be afraid to leave your physical location just to find your spiritual calling and then it will bring you back to yourself. I feel like that’s something that I have learned.

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
Yeah, this is true. It didn’t hurt that the JCC in Tokyo had a beautiful built in swimming pool, and so a lot of the socializing and bonding happened poolside, against a beautiful turquoise rectangle of water. I have friends for life from that experience. It’s such a beautiful anchor to have, and I feel gifted that the JCC did give me that start.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
That’s beautiful. So you are in Tokyo for all these years and eventually things change, and now you end up in Israel. What happened?

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
Ah, what happened? Well, there’s a 283 page memoir to describe what happened, but in a nutshell, I married a Japanese acupuncturist, who is also an Eastern philosopher and a wellness coach to this day, from a wonderful, distinguished family who embraced me, who welcomed my friends, my parents and my relatives. They brought me into their lives in a way that I’d never really experienced in New York before, and that was something to this day I’m very grateful for. So I married into the Wakabayashi family. I was accepted as one of the family members. I was the second foreigner to enter the family. They never had Jewish before, but they had an American before. So there was this feeling of familiarity. Like, “We know how to deal with these foreign people, these blue eyes people,” but in the end they’d never met a Jew before or someone who was exploring Judaism at the same time that I was open to their Taoist, Buddhist, Shinto practices and curious about them. I integrated them into my marriage in the first few years. And then what happens? Twelve years into my life in Japan, two Chabad houses arrive almost simultaneously. Spiritual explosions going off in Tokyo with their arrival.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
Were you familiar with Chabad before this happened, before they arrived in Tokyo?

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
Well, I’d lived in Brooklyn, but Brooklyn Heights, and it’s a train ride away from Crown Heights. So I’d heard of the Rebbe, but this was such a different world than my world. There is actually a scene in my book when this really happened, where I met somebody in Central Park who saw me with a tennis racket and wanted to play with me. She just kind of transitioned to Chabad and wanted to take me with her, and I remember saying, “No, thank you.” So when they arrived in Tokyo, I was in shock. I was like, “Oh my God. They found me.”

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
[Laughs] That’s funny. I guess you were ready.

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
Well, that’s what I thought too. I could appreciate that they were there exactly to reach out to people like me, and when I say that people like me, meaning people were exploring their identity far from home and going to other cultures and other religions, in other languages to know themselves, and then lo and behold, they find out that, that whatever they do, there’s something missing, and that was my experience. To bring it back to me personally, I didn’t know it was missing until I walked into the Chabads of Tokyo. There were two, and in each one, being greeted with warmth and with this Haimeshe (belonging) atmosphere and abundance of food and song—I have to emphasize the song, the joy, the chair, the children running around. This was the opposite of what we were experiencing in Tokyo life.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
So tell me a little about Tokyo life, because I don’t know much about it, but you’re saying there’s joy and song and cheer, and then that’s the opposite. What is happening in Tokyo life?

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
That’s a great question. There are a few children being produced in this culture. It’s so obvious that when my kids came to Israel and would riding on the buses and my daughter says, “Look! Did you count? There’re 20 babies on the bus.” We’re going up to a Tzfat. In Tokyo, if you see a pregnant woman once in a day, or if you see a stroller, it’s almost a big deal. If you’re living in certain sections of town, like the section where my in-laws lived, where there’s an aging population and the children don’t live in the neighborhood that the grown children—and you rarely see, children around. What happened in our family was Aki and I—Aki is one of three, that had children. So my kids didn’t grow up with other cousins, and so this is what I’m talking about. That the joy that children bring, how they enliven the atmosphere—you don’t realize it til it’s missing.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
Wow. Yeah. You know what happened yesterday? You just brought this up in my mind. I took my kids out to buy shoes. We went, especially to Jerusalem, to this store that’s an outlet, and so everything is much cheaper, but the good quality, and [sighs] I was with six kids, six out of seven. I left on behind because there was no room in the car, Then after we bought shoes, 10 pairs of shoes. I was like, “Oh my gosh,” The guy helping the cashier was putting all the shoes in the bags, and then when she said the price, he said, “What? That’s it?” and I was like, looking at him like, “That’s a ton of money,” and he says, “Yeah, but you got a ton of shoes,” and I’m like, “Yeah, because there’s a lot of feet.” That’s just part of the conversation. I just realized suddenly that not everybody thinks this is normal. You get out of your own bubble—here in this town, we’re very average. There’s a lot more families that have a lot more kids and you just feel like it’s normal and you go on with your day. You don’t think about it for one minute, but then you go out of your bubble into normal society and you realize, “Oh, this is a big deal,” and then we went out to pizza and this lady is sitting with her daughter and the table next to us, she says, “All these are yours?” and I was like, “Yeah, and I left one.”

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
I’m glad you brought it up because that was, I feel one of the gifts of Chabad house to my children, that they had a growing family, of friends and cousins, almost brothers and sisters that they grew up with. One Chabad family has 10 children and the other has seven, and there were kids the same age or close in age, and I’m so grateful that the children had this opportunity to bond with them. It became a great reason to go each Shabbat so that the children could be in an English speaking environment, granted, they were speaking Hebrew among themselves, but my kids were speaking Japanese in the school system. So English became the language of connection for both sides. That was wonderful too. I heard this from my kids, especially my son saying, “You know, mom, I want a bigger family. When I have kids, I’m not gonna have two.” I said to him, “Well, I did the best I could.” I was 38 when I had my daughter. I was a month short of 43 when I had my son, and I felt really blessed and really grateful to have both of them at quite a late stage of life. So, that’s also part of the miracle that I was able to have children at the right time, and at the right time—it was as if my, my body was waiting till the arrival of Chabad house. I could raise the children, in a Jewish environment and had I had children earlier, they would have missed out on that. So I can really say that my children’s entire childhood was, under the influence of the Rabbi and Rebbe, Hassidut and wonderful Chabad values, which I’m grateful for to this day. I’ll tell you a funny story. Each kid integrates the Chabad message in their own way, and not necessarily the way that I intended, but my daughter took it upon herself to be the fashionista that she had to get beautiful, elegant clothes to wear to Chabad for Shabbat. My daughter grew up in a t-shirt and jean culture, so that has stayed with her for life. This elegance, this way of presenting herself, which is a notch above because she, that was what was model to her at Chabad house.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
That’s so beautiful. That princess-like feel that you get when you belong to something, that you feel elevated. I like that a lot.

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
Yeah, and for my son, it expressed his connection with Jewish life expressed itself in a desire to be a Hebrew speaker because he heard it all around him and that was what motivated him to go to Israel for high school—that he wanted to come back as a Hebrew speaker, which he did. While he was in Israel, this kind of desire to cook Japanese food came up and he became a really good chef at the same time. Now that he’s–

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
Now he’s putting them together.

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
He is putting them together, working for a company that promotes kosher food to the Japanese.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
That’s amazing.

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
I want to say that that my children are not Torah scholars. It would be a miracle. If my son said to me, I want to go to Yeshiva, but I’m not holding my breath for it, but instead they’ve integrated what they need and what they can handle from Chabad. I’m thrilled that they’re able to do that.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
Nice. Beautiful. I think people think that the ideal is to completely immerse yourself in something, but sometimes it’s not. It’s integrating that’s the more valuable part because you can be immersed in something and not really integrate it into your Soul, and here you’re actually feeling like this is a real part of me, which is so integrated and I love that. We’re running out of time and I really want to get to the topic of what is it that you wish you knew then?

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI

What I wish I knew then. And tell me when then is.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
Well, if I only knew then I guess as a 25 year old going into this journey, also with your Jewish identity, being not strong and taking on someone else’s whole identity and culture, and sort of going through that journey. Obviously, there is not much you can shortcut in that. You had to go through it, but I wonder what you would have, wish you knew or what you would have told yourself, your 25 year old self going into this.

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
I wish I had people to speak to. This is what my book looks like—The Wagamama Bride.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
And then we’re going to have the link in the show notes for those who are listening to the podcast.

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
I did insist that we have a Jewish wedding as well as a Shinto wedding. And so, his agreement with going along with the Jewish wedding was very positive to me because I saw that he was open and respectful but I had no way of anticipating was that I was going to change so much over the course of 30 years, that it would be intolerable for me to be married to a non-Jew. That was the big surprise. Now, if I had mentors, if I had a Rabbi or Rebbetzin, who I could confide in and who could shower me with wisdom, rather than what I got, which was scolding and criticism, and just kind of made me really run into being radical and being rebellious, but rather for somebody to have done it with love and concern, then the outcome may have been very different.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
Yeah. I’m taking that, and I’m thinking, do you think that you would have been ready for that? Is it possible that if somebody would have approached you and said, “Listen, here’s the wisdom, and I’m going to shower you with wisdom, with warmth and love, if you would have even been open to it at that time.

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
That is a really good question. I know I wouldn’t because the opportunity to have entered a Chabad house and to have, kind of made myself vulnerable to the love that I’d experienced there would have changed me. So, no, I was very much, I would say on an NYC, New York city academic track of going for a career. Being the eldest of two daughters, my father kind of programmed us to be career minded and being academic and to be a self-sufficient, independently supporting ourselves. This was huge. It was. So this was coming from a father who had survived a Holocaust and communism in Romania. Survival was a theme of that generation and it took in our family, the form of being self-reliant and independent. That was, I would say the family motto.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
Wow. That’s beautiful. Do you have anything else you would have wished you knew? When you met your husband, you understood that he was of a certain religion and he has certain traditions, but did you really know what that means? Is there something that you wish you would have taken more time to discover or—

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
There are many, many things that of course I would have like to have done differently, but I’ll tell you nothing changes unless the consciousness shifts, and so the consciousness of me as a young woman was, “So I’m here on this adventure. I’m here to explore. I’m here to document. I’m a journalist,” and what a journalist do? They keep journals and they write and they publish on other people’s lives, and I saw this as an opportunity to turn the tables around and write about my own life experiences and where they would lead. So I didn’t know where they would leave, but I was sure they were leading somewhere interesting. I was sure because the family was a really exceptionally wonderful family in that they were so loving and that doesn’t happen to every foreign woman who marries a Jew into a Japanese family, and so I was in this unusual situation where there were four of us in this marriage. There was Aki and me, and there was parents. It was a four wheeled marriage and I spent a lot of time with his parents to the point where we traveled to Europe together. We went to London, where my mother’s family is from. We went to New York where my mother and father were both there at the time. We traveled to Massachusetts, where my mom invited the family to stay in a rented bungalow for a few weeks. My mother went to Japan six times and saw the family each time. So there was a lot of beautiful, relating going on between family members that also kind of nourished and made it possible for me to continue.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
That’s beautiful. I think that one of the things about this theme, what you wish you knew then is that you couldn’t know then. I feel like God has the ability to guide us through the things we have to go through in order to understand the things we know now, and there is absolutely no way you could have known that then.

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
And I want to say too that there are no regrets because to have regrets would be to say, I have regrets to have the children I have, and no, I am very, very grateful. With my son back in Tokyo and now deciding his next move and choosing to go to college, and to having a father who says, “I support you, whatever you do.” He says, “You decide. I’m here for you,” is the biggest gift. And I say to my son, I said, “Not every father says that, but your father saying that.” I said, “You are so lucky,” and he says to me, “I know. I know I have a great father.”

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
So that’s beautiful. And I think that looking back, sometimes you think, “Oh, that wasn’t the right person,” or, “That wasn’t right decision,” or that, whatever but it’s so beautiful to see that you surrounded yourself with good people, and that doesn’t go away. So when you had to shift your transitions and your journey, they were good people. Nothing changed about them.

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
No, it was hard though. I mean, it was rough. There was a period where they were in shock that I was doing this, moving to Israel after 30 years. “What do you mean you’re moving to Israel? What do you mean you’re leaving the family?” but as I write in my book, there were extenuating circumstances. We had severe illness in the family that needed to be treated, and I felt that that treatment was not in Japan. It had to be, tested in Israel and on the advice of my Rabbi and letters to theRebbe, it was very clear that I had to give it a try and, Aki and his family understood eventually that this was a risk worth taking. After I transited to life in, Israel, made aliyah, his mother and Aki came and visited within a few months, which was also a sign of tremendous support. They saw the world that I’d created for me and my family, my children here. At that point, both children were in Israel and they could understand, and they could go home in peace knowing that this was not only necessary, but it was relieving them of a tremendous burden and worry. What do you do with children who are Japanese and Jewish, and look different and behave different and have a Jewish mother but a Japanese father and are not fully accepted into Japanese society? They’ll never integrate completely because the Japanese mindset doesn’t allow for it. So–

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
You know what’s amazing? They’ll never integrate anywhere completely, and that’s what one of the beauties of being so unique. For years I tried belonging. We were Israelis in a foreign country. My parents were the Rabbi and Rebbetzin, so we were the ones who were welcoming and warm. I always tried belonging where I was, and I never fit in, and eventually I realized, “You’re never going to fit in. Just be who you are. Be okay with being that duel.” So it’s, it’s just really fascinating. Where can people find your book?

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
People can find my book online on Amazon. If they’re in Israel, then Pomerantz Bookstore in Jerusalem sells the book. They can write to me directly if they would like assign copy. They can get it for me. They can listen to podcasts on goshenbooks.com. I have a series called Finding Home Far from Home, where I’m interviewed about my memoir and other memoirists are talking about living outside their comfort zone in different parts of the world.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
We’re going to have all those links in the show notes. Make sure that you go get that book. It’s fascinating. thank you so much, Liane. I enjoyed speaking with you so much. I love that we can be friends

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
We were together in a retreat that was absolutely amazing. I’m so happy that I went. I’m so happy that I made friends. I’m so happy that I met you. It really is amazing. Before I go, I’m going to tell you about the retreat. Make sure that you sign up connectedforreal.com/retreat, and it’s a virtual retreat, so you don’t have to get out of home, but it is definitely going to transform your marriage. It’s called the Marriage Breakthrough Retreat, and it’s not for nothing. It’s a really amazing impactful, seven days transformation and I welcome all of you to join and sign up. So thank you so much. We will see you next week, signing off.

LIANE GRUNBERG WAKABAYASHI
Thank you.

DR. LILACH SAPERSTEIN
Hi! I’m Lilach, and I am lucky enough to be Rebbetzin Bat-Chen’s sister. Of course, I was going to be at her retreat. Now, I thought I heard everything I need to hear. I mean, I talk to Bat-Chen pretty often and I’m always getting good advice and amazing insights from her but going to the retreat really made some things very clear for me, and the way that she leads through the exercises, the visualizations, and thought experiments. It really makes you reflect in a way that’s super effective, and all of a sudden I find myself thinking of things that we did through the retreat and it really is helping me all the time. So if you’re thinking about it, you should definitely go. Not just because she’s my sister but because the ideas that she shares in the retreat will make a difference for your life.

RIVKA
Hi! My name is Rivka. I wanted to recommend Rebbetzin Bat-Chen’s retreat. I took it last year and really enjoyed it even though I’m married over 20 years and I’ve done other workshops. This was really wonderful. Very helpful and gave me a whole bunch of new insights, a whole bunch of new tools, and I learned a lot from it. So go ahead—enjoy and see how it can help you also. Take care. Bye.

REBBETZIN BAT-CHEN GROSSMAN
And that’s it! Thank you for listening to the very end. I would love if you can leave a review and subscribe to the podcast. Those are things that tell the algorithm, this is a good podcast and make sure to suggest it to others. Wouldn’t it be amazing if more people became more connected for real? And now, take a moment and think of someone who might benefit from this episode. Can you share it with them? I am Rebbetzin Bat-Chen Grossman from connectedforreal.com. Thank you so much for listening, and don’t forget, you can be connected for real.

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